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Handbuilt Motorcycle Show 2018

Handbuilt

I had high expectations coming into this show; having never been to The Handbuilt Motorcycle Show, I asked around to get a feel for what I was about to experience. I heard nothing but positive praise from two regulars who were invited builders at one point. Needless to say, after feedback like that, I was stoked to get down there and see what all the fuss was about.

My first Handbuilt experience definitely did not disappoint. The fifth installation of this ever-growing expo found its new home at the Austin American Statesman building, an expansive, industrial space that complimented the bikes on display. Outside, food trucks fed the masses while the American Motor Drome Company Wall of Death performed back-to-back shows for packed, adrenaline-cranked audiences.

Check out some of our favorite bikes from the show:

Derek Kimes of Fuller Moto 1982 Yamaha XJ750 Maxim "Turbo Maximus"

Derek Kimes of Fuller Moto 1982 Yamaha XJ750 Maxim “Turbo Maximus”

Custom Works Zon "Zonkern" '97 Buell

Custom Works Zon “Zonkern” ’97 Buell

Adam James "MINABEAR" 1983 XS650

Adam James “MINABEAR” 1983 XS650

ALP Racing Design 1950 Triumph Pre-Unit "T-200"2

ALP Racing Design 1950 Triumph Pre-Unit “T-200″2

CROIG Triumph Build from Triumph Party at Native Hostel

CROIG Triumph Build from Triumph Party at Native Hostel

Cameron Brewer Superhooligan Indian Scout

Cameron Brewer Superhooligan Indian Scout

Cameron Brewer's Superhooligan Indian Scout2

Cameron Brewer’s Superhooligan Indian Scout2

Aki Sakamoto 1940 Harley-Davidson ULH "Jaw Bone" @hogkillers

Aki Sakamoto 1940 Harley-Davidson ULH “Jaw Bone” @hogkillers

ALP Racing Design 1950 Triumph Pre-Unit "T-200"

ALP Racing Design 1950 Triumph Pre-Unit “T-200”

Clay Rathburn 2007 Triumph Bonneville "Steve McWho?"

Clay Rathburn 2007 Triumph Bonneville “Steve McWho?”

Inside I immediately found that this show is unique in one major aspect: The diversity of the builds therein. Handbuilt prides itself on being “the most-inclusive” motorcycle show right now. This year’s range of bikes perfectly embodied the vibrant diversity of the city of Austin: Some classic, some strange, but all examples of some of the best builders in the industry.

Handbuilt was the brainchild of Revival Cycles, who saw an opportunity to showcase and maintain the culture of physical craftsmanship and true ingenuity. They seek builders who exhibit vision, passion and raw skill.

You can definitely feel a different vibe in the room that is unique to this show alone. The builders, rather than being consumed by competition, were celebrating the ingenuity and achievements of their peers and as an attendee, this made the place feel more like a family reunion than a bike show.

If you’ve never been to the Handbuilt Motorcycle Show, I would add it to the list of must-attend events for 2019, and while you’re at it, make Revival Cycles a must-see destination in Austin, TX.

Photos and coverage courtesy of Giselle Levy.

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